Mexico City: If it’s cheap enough, I’ll take an Uber

I recently returned from a seven day stay in Mexico City, a busting, sprawling and exciting city with over 20 million inhabitants. Six months ago I extolled the wonders of public transportation in Japan following my return from a trip there. This post will by necessity cover a different range of topics because in Mexico City, ubers not trains and subways were my primary mode of transportation. In fact, I am a little ashamed to admit that I did not take a single subway, bus or train from the time I arrived in Mexico to the time I left. I either walked or took an uber, which were abundant and mind-blowingly cheap compared with New York prices.

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Mexico City

Whenever gas prices in the United States decrease, you can be sure that Americans will be filling up their tanks and driving more. This likely holds true in most countries around the world, even those with much better inter and intra-city transportation than the U.S. I always think to myself, if I had a car I surely would continue riding the subways and buses even if driving was very cheap. However, I found in Mexico City that if an uber was cheap enough, I would take it. Generally they were and I did.

The cost of a yellow cab ride from JFK airport into Manhattan is fixed at around $55. Use a ride hailing service and depending on traffic, the fare is likely to be similar. In Mexico City, the ride from Benito Juarez airport to the Tabacalera neighborhood near Downtown cost around $120 Mexican pesos, which comes out to around $6 US dollars. Split between me and three others I traveled with, an airport trip cost less per person than a single subway ride in New York.

A ride on the Mexico City subway is even cheaper. A single fare is only $5 pesos or about $.25 cents in America. But, in New York, cabs are a luxury good and subways are a normal good. In Mexico City for four tourists with the buying power of American salaries, subways were reduced to an inferior good and were replaced as a normal good by ubers. With this increased buying power, we opted every time for a trip in an uber because though it may be many times more expensive than a trip on the subway, at a relatively low price point, the comfort and convenience was always desirable.

A benefit of taking cars everywhere is that you see parts of a city you would otherwise miss above or below ground in a subway car. An issue however is that traffic in Mexico City can be dangerous, chaotic and choking. Roads were often very slow moving, filled with cabs, ubers, private cars and trucks. The effect of all these vehicles on the road was apparent in the smog and hazy air that blankets the city. Mexico City is also naturally prone to bad air pollution because it is surrounded on all sides by high mountains that trap dirty air above the metropolis.

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Mexico City Metrobus at a station in its dedicated lane

From its sidewalks and from the roads I noticed a lot of things that Mexico City does very well. On major avenues such as Insurgentes, bi-directional bus rapid transit lines hugged the center of the road. These, unlike Select Bus Service in New York City, are real bus rapid transit lines, with dedicated driving lines, traffic lights and high platform boarding on the same level as the bus floor. Bus lines like these have the ability to carry nearly as many passengers as a subway line and at a fraction of the price. I watched dozens of these buses pass while stuck in traffic in an uber.

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Typical Mexico City street, with bicycle lane

Mexico City also has a fair number of protected and painted bike lanes. Cycling however is not for the faint of heart there since drivers have the right of way, not pedestrians or cyclists. Cars routinely speed through crosswalks, make aggressive left and right turns when pedestrians have the right of way and blow through red lights. I walked very carefully throughout the trip and only crossed in front of a car at a stop sign when indication was clearly given that they would yield.

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